September 25th Native American Day

The first people in what has now become the United States were the Native Americans. At the time they were called Indians because the Europeans had believed they had landed on the coast of India. Most, at first, were friendly towards the Europeans or at least left them alone but they soon found themselves at war with the settlers. In fact it was the French that taught the Native Americans to take scalps. Native American bent, bowed and did everything they could to work wit the Europeans but in the end they were not able to. We all share the shame for not honoring those who were truly meant to be here. The fourth Friday of September was chosen to honor the Native American back in 1939 by Governor Cutbert Olsen of California. it grew nationally, boosted by then Governor Ronald Reagan of California in 1968.

How to celebrate – Realize what was taken from the Native Americans. Visit a Native American tribal celebration. Check and see if you have any Native American blood in your family tree.

September 27th Native American Day

There is a reason they call them Native Americans, cause they were the first ones here! There are many wonderful things about the Native Americans and we should honor them as they lived their lives with honor. It should be remembered that the Native Americans kept moving out of the settlers way until there wasn’t any place left to go. It was then that they stood up for their rights but by then, it was too late.

How to celebrate – See how many native American tribes you can name. Visit a tribe now where they can share their customs and foods with you. Read about the real Natives of America.

November 23rd Thanksgiving

Today we are thankful for all the blessings we have received in life. For our families, our friends, and our homes. And we should be since there are so many that do not have any of those things. They should never be taken for granted or accepted on face value. It is a time to celebrate those most important to us, and remember those less fortunate.

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There is much ado about the Pilgrims and Indians in Plymouth in 1621 when the first Thanksgiving is generally believed to have taken place. That may, or may not be true, but that is not the point. It was two warring people who finally decided to become friends. It didn’t last for long though, but it started people thinking differently about their enemies.

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That continued when Lincoln proclaimed the day in 1863 or 64. We were in the middle of a Civil War and yet we still had a lot to be thankful for. Now, the idea of celebrating Thanksgiving was not new, but setting it on a date when everyone would take part on the same day, was a new idea. It had been celebrated in late September or October in different states. Lincoln proclaimed the 4th Thursday of November as the date for Thanksgiving. It did not catch on everywhere for a while but it was a start.

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Finally in 1941, Congress made Thanksgiving, the 4th Thursday in November, a national holiday (all that Lincoln had already proclaimed but now official). Stop and look around at some point today and look at all the things, and people, you have to be thankful for. You won’t regret it.

How to celebrate – Enjoy your family. Enjoy your friends. Stop reading this blog and go eat!

November 13th National Indian Pudding Day

Indian Pudding was very popular in early America, falling out of favor in the 1900’s due to the time required to cook it. It had been, and still is, a cold weather treat normally served in the New England states.

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The original colonists brought the idea of pudding with them from Europe but the recipes there called for wheat which was not easily found in the new colonies. Learning how to grow, and use corn, the colonists used cornmeal instead of wheat and created a new dessert which they called Indian Pudding in honor of their new friends.

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It is generally made with cornmeal and molasses or maple syrup, ginger, butter, eggs, raisins, and nuts. Recipes were readily available in most cook books until the 19th century. For a more traditional taste, here’s a recipe for you to try.

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Or you can buy it in a can, but I’ll bet the home made version is better. Though it has become a lesser known dessert, those who did try and improve it made it creamier in the 20th century. Pending on how you make it, or buy it, you may want to add vanilla ice cream, or whipped cream to the pudding. Most recipes call for a thicker version which is a little more cake like than like a normal pudding.

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Of course you can add anything you like to it. Cherries, apples, and any berries  add a kick to the already sweet dessert.

How to celebrate – Try making your own Indian Pudding for the holidays, it would go great with a more traditional Thanksgiving meal! Go to New England where the dessert is making a little bit of a comeback and sample what they make. Serve it at Thanksgiving but don’t tell anybody what it is, see if they can guess.